I linked to the Kickstarter for the Trove Slim Wallet a while back. I ended up backing the project and after successful funding, I received my Trove a few weeks ago. After having carried an oversized wallet around for the past few years, switching to the Trove was something of a revelation. During the first few days of use, I had to double check that I had it with me since my trouser pockets felt so spacious.

It’s a really great product. For those who missed the Kickstarter, you can read more about the wallet here (it’s up for preorder in the online shop, too).

Why I have a blog

The other day, someone asked me why I have blog. I didn’t have a straightforward answer, and the question has been bugging me ever since.

I guess, to me, a personal blog is a modern form of self-expressionism — a digital journal, if you will. I can discuss whatever I want, when I want. I can talk about things I like, and the things I dislike. I don’t have to worry about someone editing my thoughts or calling me out on my language. Having a blog is also a way for me to keep practicing writing, an activity I have a love-hate relationship with[1].

I encourage everyone to try maintaining a journal. It doesn’t have to be online in the form of a blog, and it doesn’t have to be public. It can be as simple as jotting down some thoughts on a piece of paper whenever you feel like it. If you keep at it, I guarantee that you will find joy in such an archive. I often peruse my old posts, both for reference and for my own amusement. I find that collectively, they quite accurately depict my personality. That is in and of itself a good reason to continue.

  1. I suck at writing because I tend to overthink every sentence. Instead of writing a draft first and editing it for legibility later, I procrastinate and end up not writing anything at all. Silly, I know. That said, I enjoy the activity itself. []

A tour of the Matz Maersk Triple E

At 194 feet wide and 1,312 feet long, the Matz Maersk Triple E is the largest ship ever built. It can carry 18,000 20-foot containers; its propellers weigh 70 tons apiece; it is too big for the Panama Canal, though it can shimmy through the Suez. All this is to say: This is a ship of daunting proportions.

Driveclub

Sure, it lacks features you expect to see in a modern racing game. But Driveclub excels where it counts: when you are racing. The physics feel spot-on for arcade/simulation hybrid. Driving in at breakneck speeds at night—especially when in cockpit view—is both terrifying and exhilarating, and I can’t think of any other game that does it better.

★★★★☆

That Techcrunch blog post was sensationalist, misleading and above all ignorant. “Journalism” at its finest.

And no, I’m not giving them any hits by linking to the post.

The launch of Driveclub has been marred by technical issues and the game has been criticised for lack of content, but I am having an absolute blast. The driving feels sublime and, at times, it looks absolutely stunning.

Vib Ribbon releases in North America

Until E3. [sic] It was not my intention to rub salt in the Vib Ribbon wound, but to express my admiration for it as the genre-busting title it is and was. My mistake was that I had assumed that everyone who had been around in the original PlayStation era would have had their chance to play the game. I had forgotten that the American gamer was effectively denied the opportunity. To mention it at E3 was to delight some and to squirt lemon in the eyes of others. For this, I apologize. It was not my intent to dangle the delight of Vibri in front of those who longed for but could not have. It was to make a point about having the courage, and talent, to break the mold. To do what your heart demands. To me Vib Ribbon — well, to be honest, Nanaonsha for that matter — has always been committed to that ideal. An ideal I wish to celebrate.

After that E3 tease this needed to happen.

Rusty Rants

If you are looking for a well-written blog that focuses on mobile and isn’t simply singing the praises of Apple or Google, I highly recommend this one. Having a healthy dose of curmudgeon doesn’t hurt, either.