Category Archives: Software

Big data: are we making a big mistake?

“Big data” has arrived, but big insights have not. The challenge now is to solve new problems and gain new answers – without making the same old statistical mistakes on a grander scale than ever.

A great article on the pitfalls.

Bugsnag

Bugsnag detects crashes in every popular programming language and framework, automatically collecting useful diagnostics to help you resolve your errors quickly.

Starts at $29 per month (5 users, 5 projects).

Cathode

Cathode is a fully customizable terminal app with a look inspired by classic computers. Don’t let the playful exterior fool you; under the hood there’s an advanced emulator designed for serious work. Whether you prefer crisp, clean text, or a flickering, glowing mess, Cathode is the perfect tool for hacking in style.

For iOS and OS X.

dweet.io

If your product, device, machine, gadget or thing can connect to the Internet, it can use dweet.io to easily publish and subscribe to data.

dweet.io doesn’t require any setup or sign-up— just publish and go. It’s machine-to-machine (M2M) for the Internet Of Things (IOT) the way it was meant to be.

The 3.2.1 update to the Most Popular Tags plugin brings the total download count to over 20,000. I’m humbled; never once did I imagine it would be this popular.

It seems like the DirectWrite implementation for the Windows version of Chrome is close to being finished. Thank the gods.

We’re polishing the implementation and making sure it’s ready to ship to all of Chrome’s Windows users. Take a look at the “Blocked on” list for Issue 25541 for what is remaining.

We’re working hard on these and allowing DirectWrite from within the sandbox. When these are all finished we’ll ship it. From there it’ll make its way through Dev Channel, Beta, and finally hit Stable, generally around 10 weeks later, give or take.

Scaling Mercurial at Facebook

Our code base has grown organically and its internal dependencies are very complex. We could have spent a lot of time making it more modular in a way that would be friendly to a source control tool, but there are a number of benefits to using a single repository. Even at our current scale, we often make large changes throughout our code base, and having a single repository is useful for continuous modernization. Splitting it up would make large, atomic refactorings more difficult. On top of that, the idea that the scaling constraints of our source control system should dictate our code structure just doesn’t sit well with us.

For some reason, I always just assumed they use Git. The more you know.