What It’s Like to Be Profoundly Face-Blind

While the condition has been reported in medical literature since the 19th century, it wasn’t until the mid-1930s that researchers suggested facial recognition involves processes that differ from other forms of visual recognition. For most of the time it’s been recognized by modern medicine, the majority of documented cases occurred following head trauma or stroke. But over the last decade or so, as more academics have begun studying face-blindness and as public awareness of it has spread, those with so-called developmental prosopagnosia — that is, those who were born with it — have grown more likely to come forward to seek diagnoses. Nevertheless, while this condition affects about 2 percent of the population, many who have it may still be totally unaware they do.

A great piece. Interestingly, the interviewee sees face-blindness as an advantage in some situations.