Monthly Archives: January 2016

January 29, 2016

You know when someone holds a presentation and uses the word we when discussing something that could be done better? “We can improve here”, “we should not do this”.

In my experience, it always translates into “you, the audience”. Just because someone uses the collective we doesn’t mean the audience doesn’t see right through it.

January 24, 2016

Today’s purchases: Donkey Kong Jungle Beat for the GameCube (I own the bongos, so why not) and Mario’s Tennis for the Virtual Boy (I admit I haven’t got a good reason for this one).

That makes 549 games in my collection. I wonder if I’ll break 600 before year’s end.

January 21, 2016

SEGA just announced that the SEGA 3D Classics Collection is coming to retail in the US (it was only available in Japan previously).

I really wish they’d announce it for Europe, too. Mainly because M2 is behind the compilation, which ensures it’ll be absolutely top-notch.

How "Making a Murderer" Went Wrong

For those people, and for others close to the original case, “Making a Murderer” seems less like investigative journalism than like highbrow vigilante justice. “My initial reaction was that I shouldn’t be upset with the documentarians, because they can’t help that the public reacted the way that it did,” Penny Beerntsen said. “But the more I thought about it, the more I thought, Well, yeah, they do bear responsibility, because of the way they put together the footage. To me, the fact that the response was almost universally ‘Oh, my God, these two men are innocent’ speaks to the bias of the piece. A jury doesn’t deliberate twenty-some hours over three or four days if the evidence wasn’t more complex.”

The Avery case can been discussed ad nauseam in the press recently, but this is one of the more critical pieces I’ve read. Good stuff.

January 18, 2016

Why Are So Many Zappos Employees Leaving?

Why are so many employees leaving? Backtrack to 2013: Tony Hsieh, Zappos’s CEO, started promoting a new management structure called holacracy. It’s a setup that’s supposed to encourage collaboration by eliminating workplace hierarchy—meaning no more titles and no more bosses. The system instead asks workers to track all strategy decisions and their outcomes in a web-based app called Glass Frog. Roger Hodge, writing in The New Republic, called it “a radical experiment … to end the office workplace as we know it.”

I’ve been saying it for years: absolutely no hierarchy at the workplace is doomed to fail. You need some basic structure or you’ll end up in a situation where nothing gets done.