Category Archives: Articles

January 8, 2018

Where Pot Entrepreneurs Go When the Banks Just Say No

A pretty interesting on the economics of marijuana sales and state/federal laws in the US.

Growing and selling marijuana are, like using it, legal under Colorado law. But banks tend to take their cues from the federal government. Not only does selling marijuana violate federal law; handling the proceeds of any marijuana transaction is considered to be money laundering. Very few banks are willing to bear that risk.

October 25, 2017

Ice Fishers

Despite Kazakhstan’s modern capital, many of the country’s citizens hold on to vestiges of their nomadic ancestry. A conceptual look at this common practice.

September 20, 2017

In Amish Country, the Future Is Calling

But for people bound by a separation from much of the outside world, new tech devices have brought fears about the consequence of internet access. There are worries about pornography; about whether social networks will lead sons and daughters to date non-Amish friends; and about connecting to a world of seemingly limitless possibilities.

April 9, 2017

Q&A: Design lessons learned from a decade at Nintendo’s EAD

Like the great warlord Oda Nobunaga, Yamauchi wanted his vassals to compete with each other. Nintendo once had three hardware development departments plus EAD. Each of these three departments had its own game development team, and Yamauchi made the leaders of these departments compete with each other. This resulted in successes like the Nintendo Entertainment System and Game Boy, but the departments never shared information with each other.

A fascinating look behind the scenes.

Reading Steffen Rendle’s paper of Factorization Machines (PDF). Not only is the algorithm interesting, the paper itself is worth mentioning because instead of only equations, it includes a real-world example. More ML researchers should take note.

April 7, 2017

Hunting for treasure at low tide

Joseph Fox photographed the mudlarkers who comb the shore of London’s River Thames. Originally a term for the city’s poor who scraped a meagre living by scavenging in the river’s mud, it has been adopted by a new breed of treasure hunters, often armed with metal detectors.

These men and women show off their favourite finds, and discuss the joys of mudlarking.