Tag Archives: browsers

July 4, 2015
July 3, 2015

Trainspotting: Firefox 39

Editing and tweaking CSS Animations is easier than ever – Firefox 39 lets developers pause, restart, slow down, and preview new timings without having to switch applications.

This is just ridiculously useful.

June 18, 2015

Google, Microsoft, Mozilla And Others Team Up To Launch WebAssembly, A New Binary Format For The Web

The team notes that the idea here is not to replace JavaScript, by the way, but to allow many more languages to be compiled for the Web. Indeed, chances are that both JavaScript and WebAssembly will be used side-by-side and some parts of the application may use WebAssembly modules (animation, visualization, compression, etc.), while the user interface will still be mostly written in JavaScript, for example.

This is huge news.

May 13, 2015

Input Type Sandbox

Test onscreen keyboards, input types, patterns and attributes.

A great way to test just how inconsistent support for different types is across browsers.

April 3, 2015

browser.html

An experimental browser built in HTML.

browser.html is a platform research project closely related to Servo. It’s not a product. We are exploring future UI paradigms strictly only because we are curious what future needs will be on our platform and processes to build our platform, which we want to evolve.

January 27, 2015

Inside Microsoft’s New Rendering Engine For "Project Spartan"

So we set about to create a new engine using IE11’s standards support as a baseline. I watched Justin Rogers, one of our engineers, press “Enter” on the commit that forked the engine—it took almost 45 minutes just to process it (just committing the changes, not building!). When it completed, there was a liberating silence when we realized what this now enabled us to do: delete code, every developer’s favorite catharsis.

In the coming months, swathes of IE legacy were deleted from the new engine. Gone were document modes. Removed was the subsystem responsible for emulating IE8 layout quirks. VBScript eliminated. Remnants like attachEvent, X-UA-Compatible, currentStyle were all purged from the new engine. The codebase looks little like Trident anymore (far more diverged already than even Blink is from WebKit).

An fascinating read. I always though that EdgeHTML would still be very similar to Trident, but apparently not.