Tag Archives: statistics

July 28, 2016

Scipy Lecture Notes

Tutorials on the scientific Python ecosystem: a quick introduction to central tools and techniques. The different chapters each correspond to a 1 to 2 hours course with increasing level of expertise, from beginner to expert.

A great intro to Scipy and the things your can do with it.

February 5, 2016

Three and a half degrees of separation

How connected is the world? Playwrights [1], poets [2], and scientists [3] have proposed that everyone on the planet is connected to everyone else by six other people. In honor of Friends Day, we’ve crunched the Facebook friend graph and determined that the number is 3.57. Each person in the world (at least among the 1.59 billion people active on Facebook) is connected to every other person by an average of three and a half other people. The average distance we observe is 4.57, corresponding to 3.57 intermediaries or “degrees of separation.” Within the US, people are connected to each other by an average of 3.46 degrees.

Well, there we are. Not six but something closer to four. Or maybe even closer to three, given that the figure has shrunk each time Facebook—which continues to grow—has done one of these studies.

November 24, 2015

Markov and You

A classic Coding Horror piece on Markov chains (text chains in particular).

November 11, 2015

Language Trends on GitHub

The rank represents languages used in public & private repositories, excluding forks, as detected by Linguist.

No surprise at JavaScript taking the top spot. What is surprising is Java having a steady upward trend.

April 4, 2014

Big data: are we making a big mistake?

“Big data” has arrived, but big insights have not. The challenge now is to solve new problems and gain new answers – without making the same old statistical mistakes on a grander scale than ever.

A great article on the pitfalls.

March 19, 2014

How Statisticians Could Help Find That Missing Plane

What happened to Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, and where is it now?

Statistical tools can’t answer those questions any more definitively than Malaysian officials have. Yet they can help refine and focus the hunt for the plane and for a solution to the deepening mystery of its March 8 disappearance.

Includes a good basic example of bayesian inference.